BROJO's Terms & Definitions

Here's a list of common terms & definitions we use throughout this site. Also see our Knowledge Base (KB) for deeper topic discussions.

  • Accurate - a comparative measure of how truthful and real something is. The less able you are to debunk or disprove it, the more accurate it is (with the exception of irrefutable (unprovable) claims).
  • Behaviour – what you do with your expression of words or bodily actions as a response to your internal reaction.
  • Career – an ongoing development of work, through any number of jobs, that may or may not contribute to your mission.
  • Comfort/discomfort – a subjective assessment of pleasure or pain attached to sensations – anything judged as pleasurable is deemed to be comfortable, painful is uncomfortable. Craving/aversion are the more extreme forms.
  • Connection – a sensation of togetherness with another sentient being (this can occur during an interaction but also in the absence of their physicality). It can be described as consisting of rational, emotional, and physical aspects. From a neurotransmitter perspective, connection is most directly connected to oxytocin and serotonin.
  • Health – the quality of functioning of your body and psychology.
  • Integrity – a consistent behavioural application of the 6 Core Values and any other values you identify as important to you. Living with integrity means most of your behaviour can be easily aligned to your core values.
  • Job – a piece of work that provides an income. This may or may not contribute to your mission. Contributing to an income does not automatically qualify as contributing to a mission or as having integrity.
  • Mission – ongoing activities and actions that give you a sense of meaning and a reason for participating in life. Typically, a meaningful mission is directly based on your personal values. This may include a higher “purpose” and goals towards this dream, however the actions of the present moment are given the most importance for creating a sense of meaning.
  • Pain – any sensation that one does not enjoy or consider pleasurable. Pain is not the same as “harm”, which is permanent unhelpful damage. Many painful sensations are helpful, whereas others qualify more as suffering. Cravings can be viewed as a form of pain. Although the sensation feels uniquely different, it is not strictly “pleasurable” to feel horny, hungry, or needy. In both cases, pain and cravings are an expression of your brain, attempting to motivate you to action. Pain is very subjective, where two people can experience the same situation very differently, even where pain for one is pleasure for another.
  • Reaction – what occurs inside someone after they observe an external event. It is the sensational responses that come from an interpretation of an objective event. Reaction is one of the main forces behind decisions about behaviour and the formation of beliefs. Reactions can be helpful or unhelpful, depending on how they come to affect quality of life.
  • Relationship – the perception of possessing an ongoing and unbroken connection with another sentient being, inanimate object, or deceased being.
  • Sceptical – questioning any version of the truth presented to you, not accepting first impressions or appearances no matter how “right” they feel. Seeking to clarify and prove things “wrong” until they are substantially evidenced, rather than trying to prove yourself right.
  • Sensations – thoughts, feelings, beliefs, pain, pleasure, emotions and any other observable event that takes place in your conscious awareness. The occurrences in the mind’s space.
  • Sentient being – any organism that is likely to possess a conscious awareness and/or experience emotion. (Remember humans are just a species of primate).
  • Shame – a feeling of guilt relating to something you know to be true about you. When you attach the concept of ‘wrong’ or ‘bad’ to who you are.
  • Suffering – any pain that does not contribute to growth or healthy development. Unnecessary and unhelpful pain.
  • Technology – tools, data processing and resources designed, created, or harnessed by humans, including AI, Internet, satellites, machinery and robotics.
  • Truth – the closest we can currently come to identifying what is real and differentiating it from what is imagined, assumed, fictional or deliberately concocted.
  • Values – principles that guide your decision-making and behaviour in the name of longer-term quality of life. Values adjust to context, in that they are what’s best for right here, right now.